Skip to Main Content Return to the New England Law | Boston home page

Concentrations

The in-demand academic concentrations at New England Law | Boston will immerse you in a legal specialty and prepare you for a rewarding law career in one of the following areas:

  • Business Law
  • Family Law
  • International Law
  • Litigation
  • Public Interest Law
  • Small Firm Practice

You will benefit from a wide variety of experiential learning opportunities, cutting-edge coursework, and faculty advisors with deep expertise. And you will graduate with competitive credentials.

To earn a concentration, students must complete a designated number of credits (see concentration details below). Choosing an area of concentration is not required, and your academic advisor can help you switch specialties if you wish.

Keep reading for details regarding these programs and their requirements. You can also learn about our four certificate programs here.

Business Law

Through our Business Law concentration, you’ll explore the intersection of the legal and business worlds, tackling emerging issues in areas such as commercial law, corporate governance, securities practice, federal tax planning and practice, estate planning, intellectual property, health law, and sports law.

You will also benefit from the unique opportunities afforded by the Center for Business Law, where you can develop real-world legal skills through hands-on experience as early as your first semester. 

Business Law Courses

In addition to their foundational legal coursework, students pursuing a concentration in Business Law can choose among many exciting elective classes to meet their credit requirements. To complete a concentration in Business Law, students must earn 10 credits by completing courses from the following list.

  • Accounting for Lawyers
  • Business Bankruptcy
  • Business Compliance and Human Rights
  • Business Immigration Law
  • Business Organizations
  • Business Planning
  • Business Practice Credit
  • Business Transactions for Lawyers
  • Consumer Bankruptcy
  • Contract Drafting
  • Corporate Counsel: Risk Management, Governance, and Compliance
  • Corporate Finance
  • Corporate Governance
  • Employment Law
  • Financial Sector Compliance
  • Insurance Law
  • International Business Transactions
  • Nonprofit Organizations
  • Perspectives: Trade Secrets
  • Products Liability
  • Securities Regulation
  • Taxation of Business Entities
  • UCC: Negotiable Instruments and Payment Systems
  • UCC: Sales
  • UCC: Secured Transactions
  • White Collar Crime

Advisor

Professor Gary M. Bishop

Family Law

Many of our students, faculty, and alumni share a passion for helping families through the challenges—and joys—inherent to family law. This passion is core to our Family Law concentration and a reason why we are a nationally ranked school for family law.

Our Family Law concentration covers the wide spectrum of issues that fall under this diverse legal specialty, including children and the law, domestic violence, law and the elderly, and juvenile law. Students in the program also benefit from many hands-on learning opportunities, including our Family Law Clinic, where they handle real cases under the supervision and guidance of our faculty.

Family law students can also participate in pro bono projects, such as volunteering at local organizations like the Volunteer Lawyers Project, Transition House, and Community Legal Service and Counseling Center. And they can join our in-house Women’s and Children’s Advocacy Project, which focuses on issues like the protection of survivors of domestic and sexual violence. 

Family Law Courses

In addition to their foundational legal coursework, students pursuing a concentration in Family Law can choose among many exciting elective classes to meet their credit requirements. To complete a concentration in Family Law, students must earn 10 credits by completing courses from the following list.

  • Accounting for Lawyers
  • Children and the Law
  • Divorce Law
  • Domestic Violence
  • Estate Planning
  • Family Law
  • Health Care Law
  • Housing Discrimination Law
  • Juvenile Law
  • Law and the Elderly
  • Law Practice Management
  • Lawyering Process
  • Mediation
  • Modern Real Estate Transactions
  • Negotiation
  • Personal Income Tax
  • Sexual Violence and Law Reform
  • Tax Clinic
  • Wills, Estates and Trusts
  • Wills, Estates and Trusts II

Advisor

Professor Monica Teixeira de Sousa

International Law

Whether you’re interested in human rights law, international business, global economic regulations, or all of the above, you can explore and develop your skills through our in-demand concentration in International Law.

You can also take advantage of the invaluable opportunities provided by our Center for International Law and Policy, including competitive international externships, special networking events, and research projects you can join as early as your first semester.

International Law Courses

In addition to their foundational legal coursework, students pursuing a concentration in International Law can choose among many exciting elective classes to meet their credit requirements. To complete a concentration in International Law, a student must successfully complete Public International Law and two additional courses from the following list.

  • American Indian Law
  • Business Compliance and Human Rights
  • Indigenous Peoples' Rights
  • International Business Transactions
  • National Security Law
  • Perspectives: Human Rights Seminar
  • Human Trafficking Law and Policy
  • Refugee and Asylum Law 
  • Transitional Justice
  • Any Center for International Law and Policy externship or field placement*
  • Any human rights-focused course offered in a study abroad program in which the law school participates*

*It should be noted that Center for International Law and Policy opportunities and study abroad program curriculums change from year to year, and so these options may not be available to all students pursuing the International Law concentration. 

Advisor

Professor Lisa J. Laplante

Litigation

Litigation is a diverse legal specialty that can lead to an exhilarating career. The Litigation concentration at New England Law prepares students to become both criminal and civil litigators with a program that places equal emphasis on academics and developing real-world skills through many hands-on learning opportunities.

Litigation Courses

In addition to their foundational legal coursework, students pursuing a concentration in Litigation can choose among many exciting elective classes to meet their credit requirements. To complete a concentration in Litigation, students must earn 10 credits by completing courses from the following list.

  • Clinical Evidence
  • Electronic Discovery and Digital Evidence
  • Federal Courts
  • Intellectual Property Litigation
  • Lawyering Process
  • Massachusetts Practice and Procedure
  • Mediation
  • Remedies
  • Negotiation
  • Perspectives: Evidence and Advocacy
  • Trial Practice

Advisor

Professor Jordan M. Singer

Public Interest Law

Public interest law spans many legal disciplines such as criminal law, environmental law, family law, immigration law, and public international law. By pursuing this concentration, you’ll explore legal coursework across these disciplines while mastering the specific skills you need to become a public interest lawyer.

Opportunities to grow those real-world skills include working in our in-house Public Interest Law Clinic, where you'll assist real clients on a variety of cases under the direction and guidance of our faculty; volunteering with the school’s Center for Law and Social Responsibility, such as helping survivors of domestic violence, the wrongfully imprisoned, and people facing eviction; and joining our Human Rights and Immigration Law Project, where students have made a tangible difference in immigration, refugee, and human rights-based work.

Public Interest Law Courses

In addition to their foundational legal coursework, students pursuing a concentration in Public Interest Law can choose among many exciting elective classes to meet their credit requirements. To complete a concentration in Public Interest Law, students must earn 12 credits by completing courses from the following list. At least one of the courses must be a clinic listed above.

  • Administrative Law
  • American Indian Law
  • Business Compliance and Human Rights
  • Civil Rights
  • Children and the Law
  • Crimmigration
  • Criminal Procedure II
  • Domestic Violence
  • Employment Law
  • Environmental Law
  • Family Law
  • First Amendment
  • Housing Discrimination Law
  • Indigenous Peoples' Rights
  • Immigration Law
  • Juvenile Law
  • Labor Law
  • Landlord-Tenant Law
  • Lawyering Process
  • Mental Health Law
  • Nonprofit Organizations
  • Race and the Law
  • Sexual Violence and Law Reform
  • Special Education Law

Advisor

Professor Russell Engler

Small Firm Practice

Whether you’re hoping to get in on the ground floor advising a startup, want to help the family business, or plan to launch your own practice, our Small Firm Practice concentration will prepare you to hit the ground running. You’ll learn the varied skills you’ll need to succeed in these unique work environments while developing to the academic and practical foundations essential to any legal career.

As a student in the Small Firm Practice concentration, you'll have many hands-on learning opportunities, including those provided by the Center for Business Law. You’ll also benefit from our strong and industrious alumni network, full of successful solo practitioners and lawyers in small firms who are eager to help the next generation.

And whether you have a particular focus for your legal ambitions or you want to explore your options, you will receive the guidance you need to make informed decisions along the way.

Small Firm Practice Courses

In addition to their foundational legal coursework, students pursuing a concentration in Small Firm Practice can choose among many exciting elective classes to meet their credit requirements. To complete a concentration in Small Firm Practice, students must earn 10 credits by completing courses from the following list.

  • Accounting for Lawyers
  • Administrative Law
  • Business Bankruptcy
  • Business Organizations
  • Business Planning
  • Business Transactions for Lawyers
  • Children and the Law
  • Consumer Bankruptcy
  • Contract Drafting
  • Crimmigration
  • Divorce Practice
  • Domestic Violence
  • Electronic Discovery and Digital Evidence
  • Employment Law
  • Estate Planning
  • Family Law
  • Immigration Law
  • Insurance Law
  • Juvenile Law
  • Labor Law
  • Land Use Law
  • Landlord-Tenant Law
  • Law and the Elderly
  • Law Practice Management
  • Lawyering Process
  • Local Government Law
  • Mediation
  • Medical Malpractice Law
  • Modern Real Estate Transactions
  • Negotiation
  • Nonprofit Organizations
  • Personal Income Tax
  • Perspectives: Evidence and Advocacy
  • Products Liability
  • Taxation of Business Entities
  • Trademarks and Unfair Competition
  • Trial Practice
  • Wills, Estates and Trusts
  • Wills, Estates and Trusts II

Advisor

Professor Wilton B. Hyman